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Fish Recipes for Lent

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Fish Recipes for Lent

You don’t need to be Catholic/Christian to enjoy a tasty meal of fish on Friday! Think of Fish Friday as an alternative or partner to Meatless Monday. Fish offers numerous nutritional benefits and many nutritionists recommend eating fish at least once a week. So why not on Friday, when you have the time to cook fish and want to enjoy a delicious meal after a long work week?

What exactly about fish makes it so nutritious? Fish is one of the best sources of omega 3 fatty acids, which reduce inflammation, improve recovery, and boost athletic performance. Fish provides a high source of protein, which additionally assists in the recovery process.

While you could receive the benefits of omega 3 fatty acids from fish oil pills, as with many nutrients the actual source is preferable to the supplement. No supplement can provide the rich yet light taste of a bright pink salmon filet or the mouth-watering flavor of a fresh piece of blackened cod on a fish taco.

Many people avoid cooking fish based on the misconception that fish is messy and difficult to prepare. In my experience, quite the opposite is true. Fish requires a short cooking time and can be poached, baked, pan fried, or seared, meaning that there’s a method for preparing fish that will fit your culinary style.

Fish Fridays can pose a challenge in terms of meal planning, finding recipes, and knowing which type of fish to select from the market. So, as Lent begins next week, this week I’m sharing a round up of Lenten fish recipes!

These fish recipes contain no other meats (since bacon-wrapped scallops may be delicious but don’t meet the meat-free requirements of Fish Friday). With this many options, you can eat fish for lunch and dinner each Friday in Lent without ever repeating a recipe. Pair your fish with whole grains or potatoes and some roasted vegetables or a side salad and you have a nutritious and satisfying meal.

SALMON BURGERS

Ingredients:

  • 2 6 oz. cans Alaskan pink salmon
  • 3 small eggs (fresh from the farm!)
  • 1/4 cup ground chia seeds
  • generous 1/4 cup red onions, diced
  • generous 1/4 cup mixed bell peppers, diced
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • garlic powder, to taste
  • cayenne pepper, to taste

Instructions:

  1. Mix all ingredients together and form into patties.
  2. Place onto Foreman grill and let cook for ~5-7 minutes.
  3. Top with guacamole, hummus, cole slaw, spring mix…sky’s the limit!

 

5-INGREDIENT SALMON MEATBALLS

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 6oz cans of wild salmon
  • ½ cup of panko bread crumbs
  • 3 gloves of garlic minced
  • ¼ cup of chopped onion
  • 1 egg

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees
  2. Line a cookie tray with parchment paper
  3. Mix all ingredients in a bowl then form into small balls (about 1 or 2 tablespoons)
  4. Should make about 10-12 meatballs (about 4 per serving)
  5. Bake in oven for 15 minutes

 

Source: http://www.thisrunnersrecipes.com/lenten-fish-recipes-round-up/

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Why Do People Eat Fish During Lent?

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Why Do People Eat Fish During Lent?

Lent, a religious tradition observed during the 40 days before Easter, is an important period of the year for many Christians, especially Catholics. It’s a time to pay respect to Jesus’ sacrifices, suffering, life and death, through both increased mindfulness, prayer and adherence to certain practices.

For 57% of those who observe Lent, that includes fasting—but not in the formal sense of the word. A religious fast is a strict form of diet rather than abstaining from eating any food at all. While some foods and meals are cut out, there are many other things practitioners can enjoy, such as fish. Here’s a breakdown of why many Christians eat fish during the Lenten season.

It Dates Back to Roman Times

The Lenten diet consists of the food an average person could get themselves during the Roman period—namely, fish and vegetables. Essentially, meat is the only food that’s omitted from this diet, since it was considered a food for the upper class and Lent is a time to eat as the poor would. This is also a time to recognize that Jesus sacrificed himself and therefore, observers pay respect by abstaining from the fleshy meat of beast and bird on Ash Wednesday and all Fridays during Lent.

Fish is Affordable

In theory, anyone can catch a fish and feed themselves and their family. Rich or poor, in both Roman times and today, anyone could simply walk to a river or lake and find themselves with a protein-rich dinner. Fishing doesn’t require complex equipment and, at the time, was a free mealtime solution. In grocery stores now, seafood is often priced higher than some meats (though fish like Tilapia at Costco can be very reasonable), but that’s due to the commercialization of the industry. Seafood was not considered a luxury in biblical times and therefore, is an acceptable alternative to meat during Lent.

Fish is Not Considered Meat

Another reason fish is consumed during Lent? Fish has no “meat taste.” Jesus’ flesh was that of a warm-blooded mammal and fish was and is a cold-blooded animal. While this is a scientific difference and not a biblical one, the blood of the animal is the largest difference between the proteins besides the taste. In biblical records, the flesh of fish is separated from the flesh of man, beast and bird. This verse is used as the bedrock for the allowance of fish during Lent.

Fish has been a staple in Christian diets for a very long time. Moreover, it’s a core part of Lent to include it in meals during the fast. While explanations might differ as to why fish is allowed during Lent, it has always been and will likely remain an important part of this religious period. 

 

Source: http://thehealthyfish.com/825-2/

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