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Fish Recipes for Lent

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Fish Recipes for Lent

You don’t need to be Catholic/Christian to enjoy a tasty meal of fish on Friday! Think of Fish Friday as an alternative or partner to Meatless Monday. Fish offers numerous nutritional benefits and many nutritionists recommend eating fish at least once a week. So why not on Friday, when you have the time to cook fish and want to enjoy a delicious meal after a long work week?

What exactly about fish makes it so nutritious? Fish is one of the best sources of omega 3 fatty acids, which reduce inflammation, improve recovery, and boost athletic performance. Fish provides a high source of protein, which additionally assists in the recovery process.

While you could receive the benefits of omega 3 fatty acids from fish oil pills, as with many nutrients the actual source is preferable to the supplement. No supplement can provide the rich yet light taste of a bright pink salmon filet or the mouth-watering flavor of a fresh piece of blackened cod on a fish taco.

Many people avoid cooking fish based on the misconception that fish is messy and difficult to prepare. In my experience, quite the opposite is true. Fish requires a short cooking time and can be poached, baked, pan fried, or seared, meaning that there’s a method for preparing fish that will fit your culinary style.

Fish Fridays can pose a challenge in terms of meal planning, finding recipes, and knowing which type of fish to select from the market. So, as Lent begins next week, this week I’m sharing a round up of Lenten fish recipes!

These fish recipes contain no other meats (since bacon-wrapped scallops may be delicious but don’t meet the meat-free requirements of Fish Friday). With this many options, you can eat fish for lunch and dinner each Friday in Lent without ever repeating a recipe. Pair your fish with whole grains or potatoes and some roasted vegetables or a side salad and you have a nutritious and satisfying meal.

SALMON BURGERS

Ingredients:

  • 2 6 oz. cans Alaskan pink salmon
  • 3 small eggs (fresh from the farm!)
  • 1/4 cup ground chia seeds
  • generous 1/4 cup red onions, diced
  • generous 1/4 cup mixed bell peppers, diced
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • garlic powder, to taste
  • cayenne pepper, to taste

Instructions:

  1. Mix all ingredients together and form into patties.
  2. Place onto Foreman grill and let cook for ~5-7 minutes.
  3. Top with guacamole, hummus, cole slaw, spring mix…sky’s the limit!

 

5-INGREDIENT SALMON MEATBALLS

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 6oz cans of wild salmon
  • ½ cup of panko bread crumbs
  • 3 gloves of garlic minced
  • ¼ cup of chopped onion
  • 1 egg

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees
  2. Line a cookie tray with parchment paper
  3. Mix all ingredients in a bowl then form into small balls (about 1 or 2 tablespoons)
  4. Should make about 10-12 meatballs (about 4 per serving)
  5. Bake in oven for 15 minutes

 

Source: http://www.thisrunnersrecipes.com/lenten-fish-recipes-round-up/

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Benefits of Eating Fish :)

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Benefits of Eating Fish :)

The benefits of eating fish

WHY IS EATING FISH HEALTHY?

Fish is a high-protein, low-fat food that provides a range of health benefits. White-fleshed fish, in particular, is lower in fat than any other source of animal protein, and oily fish are high in omega-3 fatty acids, or the "good" fats. Since the human body can’t make significant amounts of these essential nutrients, fish are an important part of the diet. Also, fish are low in the "bad" fats commonly found in red meat, called omega-6 fatty acids.

WHY ARE OMEGA-3S GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH?

A growing body of evidence indicates that omega-3 fatty acids provide a number of health benefits. They:

  • help maintain cardiovascular health by playing a role in the regulation of blood clotting and vessel constriction;
  • are important for prenatal and postnatal neurological development;
  • may reduce tissue inflammation and alleviate the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis;
  • may play a beneficial role in cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat), reducing depression and halting mental decline in older people.

The omega-3s found in fish (EPA and DHA) appear to provide the greatest health benefits. Fish that are high in omega-3s, low in environmental contaminants and eco-friendly include:

  • wild salmon from Alaska (fresh, frozen and canned),
  • Arctic char,
  • Atlantic mackerel,
  • sardines,
  • sablefish,
  • anchovies
  • farmed rainbow trout and
  • albacore tuna from the U.S. and Canada.

WHAT ABOUT FISH OIL SUPPLEMENTS?

Besides eating fish, another way to consume omega-3 fatty acids is by taking store-bought supplements. Fish oils come from both fish caught as food for humans and from small fish caught for animal feed, such as Peruvian anchovies.

A word of caution: contaminants such as PCBs accumulate in fish oil just as they do in fish, so make sure to buy capsules that are made from purified fish oil 

WHAT ARE OTHER SOURCES OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS?

Alternative sources of omega-3s come from terrestrial sources like flaxseed, walnuts and wheat germ. While still beneficial, these do not appear to provide as a great a health benefit as the omega-3s found in fish, shellfish and marine algae.

DO THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF OMEGA-3S OUTWEIGH THE RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH CONTAMINANTS IN SEAFOOD?

Fish is generally a healthy food source and can be safely eaten in most cases. But depending on your age and health circumstances, some people should limit the amounts of fish they eat. Consider the following:

  • For young children and women of childbearing age, excessive consumption of mercury-contaminated fish can severely impact a child's development.
  • Older women and men may find it an acceptable tradeoff to exceed recommended seafood meal limits to increase their omega-3 intake.
  • People at high risk of cardiovascular disease must weigh the cancer risk of eating fish high in PCBs with the benefits of eating fish high in omega-3s, in which case the benefits of omega-3s may outweigh the cancer risk (1 in 100,000 - the level recommended by the EPA). However, these chemicals are known to cause serious health problems besides cancer, so the tradeoffs are not simple.
  • The good news is that there are several low-contaminant, high-omega-3 seafood options available (see list above), so there’s no need to risk eating contaminated fish.

 

DISCLAIMER: We do not own the write up/article. We just want to inform other people visiting our website about the health benefits of eating fish. Here's the link: http://seafood.edf.org/benefits-eating-fish . Credits to the writer/author.

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